Beetroot Soup with Poached Salmon

Beetroot Soup with Poached Salmon


Print Recipe
Beetroot Soup with Poached Salmon
The birth of this recipe came from an intention to combat some serial killer beetroot cravings! I go through phases (typically when I feel a cold brewing), where it's beet's in every possible way, to completely none. The garlic bought from the local market is intensely healing, and readily available. I already had some salmon cutlets which I was planning to use for another meal, and thought - why not! Result - nutrient, immune goodness, blood tonic combined with healing powers and good fats. I went back for seconds... Err, ok maybe thirds!
Course Main Dish
Cuisine International
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 10 minutes
Passive Time 4 minutes
Servings
Ingredients
Course Main Dish
Cuisine International
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 10 minutes
Passive Time 4 minutes
Servings
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. Finely dice onion and garlic, slice the cooked beetroot into fine strips 1-2 cm long.
  2. Heat 1 tablespoon of olive oil in a medium sized pot, add the onion and cook for 1 minute or until clear.
  3. Add garlic for 30 seconds, not too long to ensure the medicinal benefits of the garlic is not lost.
  4. Add the sliced beetroot, salt and pepper and slowly add the water using medium temperature. Slowly come to a boil and then turn down to a simmer.
  5. Add half the portion of parsley, 2 tablespoons of olive oil, bone broth, salmon cutlets. Remain on simmer mode for about 5 minutes or until the salmon is tenderly cooked.
  6. Add remains of the fresh parsley, simmer for one minute. Allow to stand for 5 minutes, gently remove the small salmon bones and serve.
Ease into bone broth

Ease into bone broth

Are you slowly transitioning to a more wholefoods diet?
Does the idea of cooking your own nutrient-dense foods seem out of reach or too complicated?

It took me a while to fathom, that I could successfully cook my own nutrient dense goodness, all on my own…  I hope this post will give you an incentive to start receiving the numerous health benefits of your own home-made bone broth and meat or fish soups and stocks.

The number of times I’ve passed on this recipe, deserves a post right there.  Bone Broth is very healing! 

Bone Broth Benefits

  • One of the most inexpensive and nutrient dense foods
  • Tastes good, easy to add to many dishes such as soups, stews, stir-frys, smoothies!
  • Boosts your immune system
  • Improves your digestion
  • Source of calcium, magnesium, phosphorus
  • Supports joint health, hair, skin and nails (high in collagen)
  • Supports connective tissue, reduces cellulite (high in amino acids)
  • Healing during illness, particularly if loss of appetite
  • Treats a leaky gut
  • Helps overcome food intolerances

It’s important to distinguish stocks versus broths!  The bones, connective tissues, and amino acids in the meat stock are what heal the gut.  Whilst bone broth is full of minerals, but is also high in glutamates, which most people with digestive disorders will not be able to tolerate, so it’s important to start slow! Meat stock should be cooked no longer than 3 hours on the stove, and bone broth is cooked for 24+ hours. There’s a huge difference in the healing elements of each.  Bone Broth is considered an advanced food in the GAPS diet. See more here, on the differences between stock versus broth.

The ingredients for bone broth are the simplest form of mother nature, it’s all about getting back to basics and wait for it…

Yes!  A long wait, for your bone broth to be born.

Now, before we get too carried away on the amount of time it can take to turn your pot into this miraculous wonder.   I encourage if you are completely new to making your own super healing foods, PLEASE start by making a soup first with the same ingredients and shortening the cooking time!  In most cases, a lot of foundational healing needs to take place first, prior your broth mode! This approach works, because when you start even contemplating the idea of bone broth, it just seemed a bit overwhelming, let’s be honest!  When I started, I had all these questions rummaging around.  Can I really make this healing food?  Do I need some special equipment?  Why so long?  And what do you mean, I have been throwing away bones which is high in nutrition?  Rest assured, it’s not too complicated – like with any new changes, we just need to make it more inviting!

 

 

Print Recipe
Bone Broth
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 45 minutes
Passive Time 2-24 hours
Servings
people
Ingredients
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 45 minutes
Passive Time 2-24 hours
Servings
people
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. Roast the chicken pieces in the oven, remove the meat put aside for another meal, and roast the bones for a further 30 minutes at 175C.  This allows for that extra flavour of deliciousness, which the fancy 5 star restaurants use.  
  2. Place bones in a large crockpot, slow-cooker or pot.  Add the water and apple cider vinegar.  Yes to Bones!  Our modern way of eating is all about the flesh of the meat, but in actual fact the bones are packed with vitamins.
  3. Let sit for 20-30 minutes in the water, to allow the apple-cider vinegar to bring out the nutrients from the bones.
  4. Peel and roughly slice the vegetables and add to the pot. Add the salt, pepper and any other spices or herbs to your liking.
  5. Bring to a boil, and then turn the heat down to a simmer for a couple of minutes. THEN turn down to the lowest heat possible, leave for minimum 8 hours up to 24 hours.  Sometimes if you just can't possibly wait, and in times of illness just wait a couple of hours, add the flesh of the meat and have more of a soup!
  6. During the first few hours of simmering, you’ll need to remove the impurities that float to the surface.  A frothy/foamy layer will form and it can be easily scooped off with a big spoon. Throw this part away.  You can typically check it every 20 minutes for the first 2 hours to remove this.  Grass-fed and healthy animals will produce much less of this than conventional animals.
  7. Remove from heat and let cool slightly. Strain using a fine metal strainer to remove the bits from the bones and vegetables. Serve in small bowls or cups and enjoy, accompanied with any meal or on it's own
Recipe Notes

Important:  Know your animal sources, avoid farmed, conventional raised animals.  You do not want to absorb chemicals.

You can mix it up with different meats and even use fish bones if you like.  Do get to know your sources.

When ready to cook for longer, general rule for beef is 48 hours, chicken 24 hours and fish broth 8 hours.

You can also add other vegetables which is really handy if you have left over vegetables in the fridge.

I also like the smell it gives to the home, very inviting!

Finally with all due respect, to your beautiful masterpiece, put aside the broth of what you will use for the next two days only, and then freeze the rest, so you can add an ice-cube to your next home cooked meal.